Traditions
In the Beginning...

Month One

It’s been a month since we began our new life in Washington, DC. We have definitely faced challenges (more than we anticipated) as we navigated a totally different way of life in our continuing-care retirement community. The people who warned us that it would take six months to feel at home here were probably right because we still think “Cambridge” when we say “home”.

We do love our apartment. We have enough of our former home’s stuff to make it feel like ours. We don’t have to run up and down stairs for everything, and when something isn’t working, we can just call maintenance.

Since one meal a day is included in our fee, if we are not out, we eat dinner in the common dining room, during fixed hours that are earlier than we are used to. I don’t miss asking Peter what he wants for dinner every day. On the other hand, I liked our cooking better.

The people here are, in general, very accomplished and friendly, but they are not our friends of fifty years (and never will be). The District of Columbia is harder to navigate than Boston was. We are, however, getting quite skilled at finding out way to our grandchildren’s house.

The weather has been lovely and warmer than we are used to. That’s a big plus.

On the other hand, we don’t have three different grocery stores within walking distance, and it’s been difficult to find one we like.

This is still a work in progress.

Comments

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Lee

Thanks for this update! We are thinking of you often. --Lee

Mary

I have been following your move. I remember that the last time we moved 15 years ago how far I had to travel to find a good grocery store. It is the reconnecting to new services that is exhausting. Thank you for sharing

Janet Winsor

Thanks for your honesty, it’s hard to relocate at any age but obviously it’s much more difficult as we age. You’ve left behind a home filled with memories, life-long friends, and a familiarity that’s hard to replace. Give yourself permission to complain, and time to adjust. I wish you new adventures in your home and fewer stairs to climb.

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